Providing information, connections and hope

USH Talks: The RUSH2A Study

January 24, 2017

Jacque Duncan, MD 

In this USH Talk, Dr. Jacque Duncan gives an overview of an upcoming clinical trial that aims to study the rate of progression of USH2A related retinal degeneration: The RUSH2A Study.

Download the transcript

Download the presentation slides

View full session on Panopto

Download the accessible list of Clinical Consortium centers

More information on clinical trial eligibility and recruitment status

Speaker Bio:

Jacque L. Duncan, MD, Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology, is the director of the Retinal Degenerations Clinic at the University of California, San Francisco. She graduated with distinction and honors from Stanford University in 1990, then spent a year doing research at the University of Colorado while she applied to medical school. She completed medical school, internship and ophthalmology residency at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Duncan completed a medical retina fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania, working with Drs. Samuel G. Jacobson and Stuart Fine. Her fellowship training focused on patients with inherited retinal degenerations including Usher syndrome. She returned to join the ophthalmology faculty at UCSF in 2000. Dr. Duncan has expertise in the diagnosis and management of patients with retinal degenerations including age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, cone-rod dystrophy and Stargardt disease. She has a strong interest in developing imaging and monitoring technologies to better evaluate both the progress of disease and the efficacy of emerging therapies. In collaboration with Austin Roorda, Ph.D., Professor at the University of California, Berkeley School of Optometry, she has studied cone photoreceptors in the eyes of patients with many different types of inherited retinal degeneration. Dr. Duncan has served as the Chair of the FFB Scientific Advisory Board since January 2015.

Suggest a topic for a future USH Talk:

Powered by Firespring